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charles17
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 06, 2020 6:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

pietinger wrote:
I have put my stub-kernel in /boot/EFI/Boot/bzImage.efi
Even this wasnt neccessary, you can copy it into /EFI direct. The only thing you have to do, ...
... seems to depend on the computer's EFI implementation, see EFI Boot Stub quick'n dirty.
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alamahant
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 06, 2020 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi you efibootmgr command should be like this
Code:

efibootmgr -c -d /dev/mmcblk0 -p 1 -L "SECLINUX" -l '\EFI\Boot\BOOTX64.EFI'
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boomerhackr
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 07, 2020 6:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok I tried running your command again with the efibootmgr and the partitions number it ran successfully, however when I rebooted my computer, it gives the exact same error. What was this command supposed to achieve?
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is in fact, GNU/Linux, or as I've recently taken to calling it, GNU plus Linux.
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pietinger
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 07, 2020 8:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

boomerhackr wrote:
What was this command supposed to achieve?

It tells UEFI (your BIOS) where to find a bootable programm (Operating System / Kernel / Bootloader), so you can choose it in your BIOS.
If then (after UEFI started your kernel) your Kernel cant access your root-partition, you have a problem with your kernel. The main two problems are:
1.) The kernel parameter "root=..." is showing to a wrong partition, or
2.) Needed kernel-modules for accessing the DRIVE and FILESYSTEM where your root-partition lies are not compiled in (fixed/NOT as module) your kernel.
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alamahant
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 07, 2020 9:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seeing how much suffering booting into a newly installed Gentoo system is causing to many many people i think that
1 Use grub
2 use seperate /boot and /boot/efi partitions
3 use initramfs (dracut works nicely)
4 all other booting methods like efi stub and --I dont know, systemd boot or other bootloaders or absence of bootloaders or absence of initramfs should be discouraged because many people get extreme frustration.
5 The most traditional and conservative approach to booting should be used.

Maybe we need a kind of script to check all these things and give warnings and suggestion to users........

Also with each version of gentoo-sources maybe a "large" .config should be included for people who dont mind using a big kernel or a kernel not custom made only for their machine.
It can be up to the user whether to use such .config or not.
Just some random thoughts...

:D
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GDH-gentoo
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 07, 2020 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

boomerhackr wrote:
Ok I tried running your command again with the efibootmgr and the partitions number it ran successfully, however when I rebooted my computer, it gives the exact same error. What was this command supposed to achieve?
According to this post, you have a kernel panic. If you have a kernel panic, then the bootloader did its job and started the kernel. This means you could see the GRUB menu and select an entry, therefore the UEFI firmware did its job and started the bootloader. efibootmgr modifies EFI variables, i.e. it controls the behaviour of the UEFI firmware. So why on earth did you use efibootmgr? What you should be trying to fix is the kernel's configuration, the initramfs and / or the kernel command line that GRUB is passing to the kernel.

alamahant wrote:
Seeing how much suffering booting into a newly installed Gentoo system is causing to many many people i think that
1 Use grub
2 use seperate /boot and /boot/efi partitions
3 use initramfs (dracut works nicely)
4 all other booting methods like efi stub and --I dont know, systemd boot or other bootloaders or absence of bootloaders or absence of initramfs should be discouraged because many people get extreme frustration.
5 The most traditional and conservative approach to booting should be used.
A solution more in the spirit of Gentoo would be actually understanding a computer's boot sequence and the way the chosen bootloader works...

pietinger wrote:
If you want to install grub, then you have to mount this partition to /boot
Actually, for GRUB, the ESP can be mounted wherever you want, as long as you tell grub-install where it is using the --efi-directory option. /boot/efi is usually shown in documentation because, for a UEFI install of GRUB, if --efi-directory is not given:
  • If /boot/efi exists, is a directory, and grub-install finds that a FAT filesystem is mounted at it, it will assume it is the ESP. If some other filesystem is mounted at /boot/efi, grub-install fails with an error. Otherwise
  • If /boot/EFI exists, is a directory, and grub-install finds that a FAT filesystem is mounted at it, it will assume it is the ESP. If some other filesystem is mounted at /boot/EFI, grub-install fails with an error. Otherwise
  • If the (hidden) --root-directory option was given with a value that is not "/", and grub-install finds that a FAT filesystem is mounted at the directory specified by it, it will assume it is the ESP; otherwise it fails with an error.
charles17 wrote:
pietinger wrote:
I have put my stub-kernel in /boot/EFI/Boot/bzImage.efi
Even this wasnt neccessary, you can copy it into /EFI direct. The only thing you have to do, ...
... seems to depend on the computer's EFI implementation, see EFI Boot Stub quick'n dirty.
I believe that UEFI-compliant firmware is only required to look in subdirectories of the \EFI directory, but implementations are not forbidden to extend the behaviour.
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boomerhackr
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 08, 2020 3:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I tried running your efibootmgr command with the correct partition number, however this gives the same error when I rebooted. What was this command supposed to achieve?
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is in fact, GNU/Linux, or as I've recently taken to calling it, GNU plus Linux.
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boomerhackr
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 08, 2020 5:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

alamahant wrote:
Seeing how much suffering booting into a newly installed Gentoo system is causing to many many people i think that
1 Use grub
2 use seperate /boot and /boot/efi partitions
3 use initramfs (dracut works nicely)
4 all other booting methods like efi stub and --I dont know, systemd boot or other bootloaders or absence of bootloaders or absence of initramfs should be discouraged because many people get extreme frustration.
5 The most traditional and conservative approach to booting should be used.

Maybe we need a kind of script to check all these things and give warnings and suggestion to users........

Also with each version of gentoo-sources maybe a "large" .config should be included for people who dont mind using a big kernel or a kernel not custom made only for their machine.
It can be up to the user whether to use such .config or not.
Just some random thoughts...

:D

What do you mean use seperate /boot and /boot/efi partitions, and how can I set that up? Also what is dracut for initramfs and why would this be useful? I want to try to use a smaller kernel, since that should speed it up, and that is the part of the reason gentoo is used.

pietinger wrote:
boomerhackr wrote:
What was this command supposed to achieve?

It tells UEFI (your BIOS) where to find a bootable programm (Operating System / Kernel / Bootloader), so you can choose it in your BIOS.
If then (after UEFI started your kernel) your Kernel cant access your root-partition, you have a problem with your kernel. The main two problems are:
1.) The kernel parameter "root=..." is showing to a wrong partition, or
2.) Needed kernel-modules for accessing the DRIVE and FILESYSTEM where your root-partition lies are not compiled in (fixed/NOT as module) your kernel.


Oh I think you are confused, I figured out how to install grub earlier in the thread which was my original problem, and it shows my kernel in the grub menu. I then had a problem with the kernel not finding the root partition which was specified in the grub config. What is the kernel parameter "root=...", and how do I set it? When I boot gentoo and it has a kernel panic, it allows me to drop to a shell. When I type "ls /dev/" no mmcblk devices ( which my root partition is ) show up, however I already built in everything under Device drivers/mmc/sd/sdio card support. Which other drivers are needed?
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pietinger
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 08, 2020 9:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

boomerhackr wrote:
What is the kernel parameter "root=...", and how do I set it?

I told you, you shall read a gentoo wiki article (stub kernel). You diddnt, or ?

You have to differentiate between booting with a bootmanager, like grub, and starting the kernel directly (then the kernel is called stub kernel).

In both cases, the kernel has to know WHERE it finds the root partition.

1. If your BIOS starts via UEFI direct your kernel, you have to compile this information IN YOUR kernel (see gentoo wiki article).

2. When grub starts your kernel, then usually grub tells the kernel where to find its root partition. Sometimes grub gives a wrong information. For this case I gave you the link to another thread.

In both cases, the kernel MUST be able to reach (driver) and read (filesystem) its root partition. As far as I understand this is your actual problem.

boomerhackr wrote:
When I type "ls /dev/" no mmcblk devices ( which my root partition is ) show up, however I already built in everything under Device drivers/mmc/sd/sdio card support. Which other drivers are needed?


@Jaglover gave you a link about eMMC. Did you read it ?

If yes, what is your actual dmesg log ?
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Jaglover
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 08, 2020 9:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is also possible the new kernel wasn't installed properly and Grub still boots the old one.
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Tony0945
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 08, 2020 1:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not to confuse things further, but Jaglover's last post is why I boot UEFI system's with refind.

1. Grub - A holdover from pre-UEFI days. Grub 2.x tries to generate an auto configuration line. In my experience changing a single character makes it non-bootable. Grub must be installed into the UEFI partition. It becomes the stub kernel.

2. Stub Kernel - New with UEFI. As described above you just overlay your kernel on it. This implies you have one kernel. If it has an error, you can't boot as you can with grub or refind.

3. Refind - Also replaces the stub kernel but has a menu like grub. Unlike grub, it will actually build your menu with the right set up configuration, displaying a list of bootable kernels in date order, newest first.

I have setup two Gentoo systems with refind (or reFind, an odd English language construction), one Gigabyte mobo and one MSI mobo. If you google "forums.gentoo refind tony0945" you will find a long sad thread of all the mistakes I made. The Gigabyte board was my first refind installation and my first UEFI installation and the structure of refind changed during the installation. Those are my excuses. The PRIME error was not installing in a UEFI environment. That MUST be done and must be done for any of the three methods. This is because unlike BIOS boot where the BIOS booted into a fixed location and didn't give big rodent's patootie what code was there, efibootmgr actually alters your BIOS code. You have to enter the BIOS (DEL-DEL-DEL ...) and select the boot location which efibootmgr has put there. If you are skilled in efibootmgr (I'm not) you can set your Gentoo booter as the first (default) choice. If you are not, as I am not, and obviously you are not, then you boot into the BIOS the first time and set the boot order with your BIOS set up screen as you have for over a decade.

Code:
 ~ # efibootmgr
BootCurrent: 000D
Timeout: 1 seconds
BootOrder: 000D,0003,000E
Boot0003* CD/DVD Drive
Boot000D* UEFI OS
Boot000E* Hard Drive
That last choice (I am assuming) is conventional BIOS boot of the hard drive.

I won't speak for grub2, but stubkernel obviously requires the kernel to be on the gpt, refind only requires refind to be on the gpt. My kernels are in .boot which is NOT a seperate partition. I don't think grub2 requires this either, but I'm not sure. My gpt is very small and still mostly unoccupied. Everything else is ext4.
Code:
~ # fdisk -l /dev/sda
Disk /dev/sda: 465.78 GiB, 500107862016 bytes, 976773168 sectors
Disk model: CT500MX500SSD1
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: 3EE9432E-169D-4EC5-A9EC-7F932FBDCD61

Device      Start       End   Sectors   Size Type
/dev/sda1    2048    206847    204800   100M EFI System
/dev/sda2  206848 976773134 976566287 465.7G Linux filesystem


The point is, "Are you in fact booting what you think you are booting?" and the second point is "Do you really need the archaic separate /boot ?"
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Jaglover
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 08, 2020 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

2. I have two EFI stub kernels, current and backup and I can choose between them by bringing up firmware boot menu by hitting F11.

Code:
# efibootmgr
BootCurrent: 0001
Timeout: 1 seconds
BootOrder: 0001,0000,0002
Boot0000* Gentoo Backup
Boot0001* UEFI OS
Boot0002* Hard Drive


efibootmgr can be used to add as many EFI bootables as you want. Well, there is a limit in firmware, but I'm sure ten entries are possible.
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alamahant
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 08, 2020 3:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tony0945,
If one uses lvm for the root partition would he not indeed need to have a separate /boot normal partition?
Is indeed a seperate /boot partition archaic?
And if yes does your proposed scheme work with lvm also and how to make it do so?
Can one place the kernel right on the ESP?
Thanks a lot..
:D
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Tony0945
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 08, 2020 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know absolutely zero about lvm.
Yes, you can put the kernel on the ESP. that's what stubkernel does. Many people store all their kernels there. I prefer not to store anything more than needed on FAT.

SAeperate boot partition was conceived because long ago PC BIOS could not find partitions beyond a certain size (I forget the exact limit), so the things that need to be present to load the kernel had to be in that small partition that originally had to be ext2. Once the kernel is in memory and running BIOS limitations are far behind.

Try "documentation" here for grub: https://www.gnu.org/software/grub/
And here for refind" https://www.rodsbooks.com/refind/
Also "man efibootmgr"
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boomerhackr
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 09, 2020 5:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am starting to think that at least one of the issues is related to missing modules in my kernel because when I booted gentoo and dropped to a shell and ran "ls /dev", nothing with mmcblk showed up (my root partition is /dev/mmcblk0p2). So I just tried to build in all of the modules in Device Drivers//MMC/SD/SDIO, Device Drivers//Serial ATA and Parallel ATA, Device Drivers//SCSI device support, and Device Drivers//USB Support (which were mentioned in the eMMC thread as required to detect the root partition). However when I try booting and running this command it again, there is the same output. Which other modules are needed for eMMC?
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Tony0945
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2020 6:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Look at these configuration items and build yours into the kernel, niot as modules.
Code:
tony@MSI ~ $  zgrep MMC /proc/config.gz
CONFIG_PCI_MMCONFIG=y
CONFIG_MMCONF_FAM10H=y
# Supported MMC/SDIO adapters
CONFIG_MMC=y
CONFIG_MMC_BLOCK=y
CONFIG_MMC_BLOCK_MINORS=8
# CONFIG_MMC_TEST is not set
# MMC/SD/SDIO Host Controller Drivers
# CONFIG_MMC_DEBUG is not set
# CONFIG_MMC_SDHCI is not set
# CONFIG_MMC_WBSD is not set
# CONFIG_MMC_TIFM_SD is not set
# CONFIG_MMC_CB710 is not set
# CONFIG_MMC_VIA_SDMMC is not set
# CONFIG_MMC_VUB300 is not set
# CONFIG_MMC_USHC is not set
# CONFIG_MMC_USDHI6ROL0 is not set
CONFIG_MMC_CQHCI=y
# CONFIG_MMC_TOSHIBA_PCI is not set
CONFIG_MMC_MTK=y


EDIT:
Quote:
CONFIG_MMC_SDHCI: │
│ │
│ This selects the generic Secure Digital Host Controller Interface. │
│ It is used by manufacturers such as Texas Instruments(R), Ricoh(R) │
│ and Toshiba(R). Most controllers found in laptops are of this type.
│ t ---> │
│ If you have a controller with this interface, say Y or M here. You ce driver │
│ also need to enable an appropriate bus interface. │
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boomerhackr
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2020 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I added in the output of "zgrep MMC /proc/config.gz" to .config (changing m to y) and recompiled my kernel however still the same error occurs when rebooting.
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2020 8:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

boomerhackr wrote:
I added in the output of "zgrep MMC /proc/config.gz" to .config (changing m to y) and recompiled my kernel however still the same error occurs when rebooting.

Do it with "make menuconfig" ! (and then recompile and install the kernel)
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2020 9:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What do you mean "do it with make menuconfig", why can't I configure the .config file manually, what would be the difference? I added the output directly to the .config file, removed duplicate lines and chose to build in the modules.
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2020 9:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

boomerhackr wrote:
[...] why can't I configure the .config file manually, what would be the difference?

Sometimes the kernel config sets some needed options elsewhere if you enable something.
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2020 1:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

boomerhackr wrote:
What do you mean "do it with make menuconfig", why can't I configure the .config file manually, what would be the difference? I added the output directly to the .config file, removed duplicate lines and chose to build in the modules.
.config:
# Automatically generated file; DO NOT EDIT.
These warnings are not added idly. If you edit the file by hand, you may create an inconsistent configuration. It might all work anyway. It might fail to build. In theory, it might even build incorrectly. Why do you want to edit the file by hand?
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2020 3:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wanted to add the eMMC related modules from the archiso kernel (I am using archiso on a usb to boot) to my gentoo kernel. I was going to do this by adding lines of kernel config from archiso containing eMMC related modules to my gentoo kernel config using
Code:
zgrep MMC /proc/config.gz >> /usr/src/linux/.config

How would I do this with menuconfig without looking up where all of the modules related to eMMC from my arch linux config and checking all of them individually?


Edit: Here is my dmesg: http://dpaste.com/2N3XAPK
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2020 6:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You started with a reasonably simple problem, 10 days later you still have it.

Looking up modules in menuconfig is as simple as typing
Code:
/ <module>
ie
Code:
/ mmc


There's a lot more to solving this than just enabling everything with MMC in the name.

Knowing the hardware would help.
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2020 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

When you read the "help" in menuconfig you see what happens.
An example from my own ethernet driver:
Code:

│ CONFIG_ALX:                                                                                                                                                                                     │ 
  │                                                                                                                                                                                                 │ 
  │ This driver supports the Qualcomm Atheros L1F ethernet adapter,                                                                                                                                 │ 
  │ i.e. the following chipsets:                                                                                                                                                                    │ 
  │                                                                                                                                                                                                 │ 
  │ 1969:1091 - AR8161 Gigabit Ethernet                                                                                                                                                             │ 
  │ 1969:1090 - AR8162 Fast Ethernet                                                                                                                                                                │ 
  │ 1969:10A1 - AR8171 Gigabit Ethernet                                                                                                                                                             │ 
  │ 1969:10A0 - AR8172 Fast Ethernet                                                                                                                                                                │ 
  │                                                                                                                                                                                                 │ 
  │ To compile this driver as a module, choose M here.  The module                                                                                                                                  │ 
  │ will be called alx.                                                                                                                                                                             │ 
  │                                                                                                                                                                                                 │ 
  │ Symbol: ALX [=y]                                                                                                                                                                                │ 
  │ Type  : tristate                                                                                                                                                                                │ 
  │ Defined at drivers/net/ethernet/atheros/Kconfig:73                                                                                                                                              │ 
  │   Prompt: Qualcomm Atheros AR816x/AR817x support                                                                                                                                                │ 
  │   Depends on: NETDEVICES [=y] && ETHERNET [=y] && NET_VENDOR_ATHEROS [=y] && PCI [=y]                                                                                                           │ 
  │   Location:                                                                                                                                                                                     │ 
  │     -> Device Drivers                                                                                                                                                                           │ 
  │       -> Network device support (NETDEVICES [=y])                                                                                                                                               │ 
  │         -> Ethernet driver support (ETHERNET [=y])                                                                                                                                              │ 
  │           -> Atheros devices (NET_VENDOR_ATHEROS [=y])                                                                                                                                          │ 
  │ Selects: CRC32 [=y] && MDIO [=y]

Look to the last line ! Here you see what I enabled also (automatically) when I enabled this option.
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Tony0945
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Location: Illinois, USA

PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2020 1:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Typing / MMC in menuconfig will give you a big list of items with MMC in the name. Each one will have a number in parenthesis in it, i.e (1) or (2) ....
Just press that number key and menuconfig will jump to the item. Pressing help will tell you more about the item. Usually there is a suggestion to press Y or N if you don't understand. Sometimes these are wrong for your use case. Saying N to debug items is almost always correct unless you are interested in debugging the kernel. For a user that's like do-it-at-home lobotomy.

If you have really screwed the pooch by manually editing, print out your configuration, start back with the default .config (re-emerge gentoo-sources will do this) and start back from scratch with your printed list using make menuconfig, I hope this won't be necessary. Keep it in mind for a last resort.

lspci will probably give a good clue as to what hardware options you need.
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